25 7 / 2014

theworldofchinese:


Cantonese Call for Cantonese Day
In a fight back against the Beijing government’s endless quest for centralization and standardization, supporters of the Cantonese dialect are calling for a “Cantonese Day”, that would celebrate the  Guangdong people’s mother tongue, writes the South China Morning Post. The day, supporters say, should be held on July 25, a reference to theprotests in Guangzhou on July 25, 2010, which were in response to the central government’s efforts to switch the language of the local news TV station to Putonghua.
Similar to the context for the protests of 2010, support for the dialect’s commemoration day comes amid the intention of the provincial television station to convert more of its programming to Putonghua. In 2010, the government bowed to public pressure, just as they are doing this time around. A compromise has been decided that will see each hour of Cantonese programming alternating with an hour of Putonghua.
Continue reading here…

theworldofchinese:

Cantonese Call for Cantonese Day

In a fight back against the Beijing government’s endless quest for centralization and standardization, supporters of the Cantonese dialect are calling for a “Cantonese Day”, that would celebrate the  Guangdong people’s mother tongue, writes the South China Morning Post. The day, supporters say, should be held on July 25, a reference to theprotests in Guangzhou on July 25, 2010, which were in response to the central government’s efforts to switch the language of the local news TV station to Putonghua.

Similar to the context for the protests of 2010, support for the dialect’s commemoration day comes amid the intention of the provincial television station to convert more of its programming to Putonghua. In 2010, the government bowed to public pressure, just as they are doing this time around. A compromise has been decided that will see each hour of Cantonese programming alternating with an hour of Putonghua.

Continue reading here…

25 7 / 2014

geritsel:

Liu Maochan - a Chinese painter with a touch of French impressionism à la Monmartre. Gorgeous.

Really love these paintings!
Sidenote: A quick Google search reveals that the artist’s name is actually Liu Maoshan.

(via 75percentchanceoffury)

25 7 / 2014

When it’s too late to cook a proper dinner.

When it’s too late to cook a proper dinner.

24 7 / 2014

One of the hardest things for foreigners learning Chinese is the fact that there is no alphabet, which means that (almost) every word has its own unique character which must be memorised in order for the learner to know how to read it/write it.

Needless to say, if two people are meeting for the first time, there is a good chance that they still won’t know how to write each other’s names after being introduced, and the lack of an alphabet means that they can’t simply ask the other person to spell it out for them. So what can they do?

The first, and simplest, method is to give them an example of a common word which uses the same character. So, for example, if someone’s surname is Zhou, they might say “Zhou, as in Zhou Enlai” (“周恩来”的周, Zhou Enlai de Zhou).

Alternatively, they could give the components of the character. So, if someone had the surname 吴 (Wu) they could say that it consists of the character for mouth (口) and the character for sky (天). 

Of course, this is not always a fool-proof way of “spelling” Chinese words, but it works most of the time, and if all else fails, you can always just whip out your phone or a pen and paper so the other person can write it down for you…

23 7 / 2014

Yesterday I was eating squid and it reminded me of a phrase we learnt in class last year: 炒鱿鱼 (chao youyu) which literally means “fried squid” but can also mean to fire somebody or to be fired (被炒鱿鱼, bei chao youyu).

The reason “fried squid” has become a euphemism for being fired is that when squid is fried, it curls up, and historically workers who got laid off would wrap all their belongings up in a blanket, which looked similar to fried squid.

22 7 / 2014

theworldofchinese:


Sudden Death On The Rise In Southern China 
Cases of sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome are on the rise in the southern manufacturing city of Dongguan, according to the South China Morning Post. City police reported 893 cases from January 2001 to October 2013, a more than a threefold increase on the last time Dongguan tallied these numbers, January 1990-December 1999.
Sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUND) is a wordy classification but an accurate one. Usually striking men between the ages of 20 and 40 in the night, it kills  them in their sleep….
Continue reading here…

theworldofchinese:

Sudden Death On The Rise In Southern China 

Cases of sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome are on the rise in the southern manufacturing city of Dongguan, according to the South China Morning Post. City police reported 893 cases from January 2001 to October 2013, a more than a threefold increase on the last time Dongguan tallied these numbers, January 1990-December 1999.

Sudden unexpected nocturnal death syndrome (SUND) is a wordy classification but an accurate one. Usually striking men between the ages of 20 and 40 in the night, it kills  them in their sleep….

Continue reading here…

22 7 / 2014

Rethinking Civilization - Crash Course World History 201

Whenever we look at history, most of us tend to assume that civilization is always best, and that some civilizations are better than others, which of course, is a rather biased approach.

In the Chinese context, it’s important to consider the term “Sinicization” which means that historically, other peoples and cultures were so impressed by the superiority of China’s civilization that they became “Sinicized” (adopted Chinese culture), a notable example being the Manchu rulers during the Qing dynasty. However, the Manchus did not completely adopt all Chinese cultural practices, and they also enforced some aspects of their own culture upon the Chinese people (like men having to wear queues (the long braid)).

Moreover, the term “Sinicization” is problematic because often it conflates “Chinese” with “Han” (the largest ethnic group in China) - there are over 50 minority peoples in China, whose history and culture do not resemble that of mainstream Han society, and it is important to note that within China these people are also expected to “Sinicize” (read “become more like the Han”). In fact, in Chinese it is called 汉化 (Hanhua), which literally means “to change to Han,” and it is often considered a necessary requirement in order to become “more civilized”.

Summary: When studying history and cultures, there’s never only one way to look at things, and context is everything.

21 7 / 2014

I always find it highly ironic when the CCP says that it wishes to promote Marxist thought as a way to counter Western concepts such as democracy, which is often said to be “incompatible” with the Chinese context, given the fact that Marx was a Westerner who developed his ideas in the West.  

21 7 / 2014

erenyaeqr:

elizajumel:

the first female chinese immigrant to america was a sixteen-year-old girl who was part of a cultural exhibit where she sat in a life-size diorama and people watched her eat with chopsticks while wearing silk clothes and that’s really all you need to know about the commodification of chinese women

http://ethnicstudies.berkeley.edu/documents/wcp%20paper.html

if you’d like to read more about the lives of early immigrated chinese women

(via muffinw)

20 7 / 2014