21 10 / 2014

archiemcphee:

Some say that the best way to overcome a phobia is to face the fear head-on. They also say this should be done gradually, so this swaying glass-bottomed bridge might be best left for the advanced stages of conquering acrophobia. The photos alone are enough to make our palms sweaty.

The hair-raising suspension bridge is located 180 meters (590 feet) above a valley floor in Pingjiang County, in the Hunan province of southern China. Suspended between two rocky peaks, the bridge measures 300 meters (984 feet) long and, yes, it really does tend to sway in the breeze.

But don’t worry about freaking out before you even get halfway across. Specially trained staff are on hand to assist visitors in need of emotional support and encouragement in order to complete the thrilling/terrifying journey across the glass bridge.

Yun Ku, a 23-year-old who did the walk, said: “I was fine at first but by the time I was a third of the way across I just went weak at the knees. I had to go back when it started to move and needed a lot of coaxing from my boyfriend. I thought I was going just melt on the spot. My legs wouldn’t work.”

[via The Telegraph and Metro.co.uk]

(via wilwheaton)

20 10 / 2014

19 10 / 2014

Photographs by Fan Ho

Taken in Hong Kong in the 50’s. 

(Source: fanhophotography.com, via petitbabelfish)

18 10 / 2014

泉城 (Quan Cheng) - City of Springs

泉城 is another name referring to the city of Jinan, the capital of Shandong Province, which is famous for its many springs. Having lived there for a year, I’m sure part of why I love this name is the fact that it conjures up a sense of nostalgia, but I also love it because I think in Chinese it sounds very poetic and beautiful in an understated way. 

In this case, I think the fact that Chinese uses characters makes reading it more powerful. I can’t really explain it, but I feel like in English, “City of Springs” looks/sounds rather empty… If anything, it sounds like a rather lame motto made up by a tourist board. But in Chinese, the combination of these two simple characters feels more expressive - it just feels as though there is more significance woven into the two characters. When I read “泉城,” I can actually picture springs bubbling all over the city, but when  I read “City of Springs” its meaning seems hollow to me.

I find it interesting how a particular word or phrase can mean the same thing in two languages, but have more emotive power in one language than the other (especially when that language isn’t even your native tongue).

17 10 / 2014

Warning! Explicit Content! - China Uncensored

(it’s not what you think…)

16 10 / 2014

15 10 / 2014

taktophoto:

Hong Yi renders traditional Chinese motifs and scenes with makeup.

(Source: designboom.com, via petitbabelfish)

14 10 / 2014

13 10 / 2014

Thoughts on a Quiet Night by Li Bai
In Front of the Bed, the Light of the Bright Moon Shines
I Suspect it is Frost on the Ground
I Raise My Head and Gaze at the Bright Moon
I Lower My Head and Think of My Beloved Hometown
My knowledge of Chinese poetry is woefully inadequate (but then, so is my knowledge of English-language poetry), but I remember learning this particular poem in Chinese class a couple of years ago. It was written during the Tang Dynasty and is considered a classic.

Thoughts on a Quiet Night by Li Bai

In Front of the Bed, the Light of the Bright Moon Shines

I Suspect it is Frost on the Ground

I Raise My Head and Gaze at the Bright Moon

I Lower My Head and Think of My Beloved Hometown

My knowledge of Chinese poetry is woefully inadequate (but then, so is my knowledge of English-language poetry), but I remember learning this particular poem in Chinese class a couple of years ago. It was written during the Tang Dynasty and is considered a classic.

12 10 / 2014

jnkboy:

HONG KONG (Sep 2014) #1

(via petitbabelfish)